Jeffrey DeBarathy, The Ultimate “Go-To” Entertainer


“…this innovative young man is putting a very unique stamp on Las Vegas”.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article previously appeared on another site in April of 2016. Jeffrey has gone on to work with many other artists and shows, including costume design for INFERNO at Paris Hotel Casino. He continues to be a featured performer at V Theater’s ZOMBIE BURLESQUE.

It’s pretty common for a performer or celebrity to be described as “chameleon-like”. Some entertainers can step into a wide variety of roles and fully command them. But a real show-biz chameleon can do just about anything, whether it be singing, dancing, acting, acrobatics…or choreography and costume design?

Yes, it’s possible. Say hello to Vegas multi-hyphenate Jeffrey DeBarathy.

11402944_963415123711146_1776233688450636532_n

If you’ve attended any Vegas shows in the past several years, chances are that you’ve experienced the talents of Jeffrey DeBarathy. This 35-year-old Montana native has had involvement in the widest variety of productions that this writer has ever seen. It’s not unusual to encounter Jeffrey himself at least once on each of my trips to Sin City. The guy is EVERYWHERE.

Jeffrey began training in the arts when he was only three years old. He studied jazz, tap, and gymnastics in his hometown of Butte until the age of 19 when he was offered a chance to join Celebrity Cruise Lines as part of the Molyneux-Musick Entertainment Company. Those three years literally opened up a whole world of opportunities which saw DeBarathy performing in China, the Caribbean, Tahiti, Europe, Hawaii, and Alaska.

From there, Jeffrey made the decision to try his luck in Las Vegas. He was only 22 at the time but dove headfirst into action by joining the cast of the notorious STORM at Mandalay Bay and Charo‘s Spanish variety show BRAVO. His unconventional good looks and wild mane no doubt made an impression on casting directors, but it was Jeffrey’s talents that brought him to the front.

Jeffrey DeBarathy

               Jeffrey (upper right) with the cast of “Alice – A Steampunk Concert Fantasy.”

It wasn’t long before Jeffrey was taking charge behind the scenes, too, as dance captain for FASHIONISTAS. That erotically-charged fantasy played at KRAVE nightclub for four years. Numerous other shows followed, most notably Rio‘s final incarnation of SHOW IN THE SKY, the iconic attraction which closed permanently in 2013.

It was during a period of modeling in special events and print ads that Jeffrey discovered a flair for costume and fashion design. His talent for blending unusual and outrageous fantasy elements into his designs has made DeBarathy the go-to designer for many shows in the city. Jeffrey eventually launched his own specialty line of costumes, clothing and accessories called Jd Fashion Design.

Jeffrey DeBarathy

                             Jeffrey’s daring designs adorn The Men Of Steele

Jeffrey DeBarathy

Jeffrey (foreground) makes adjustments to a costume during rehearsals for 53X at Chateau Nightclub

In just the past month, Jeffrey has added three new productions to his resume, as costume designer for The Men Of Steele male revue and 53X (the sexy new show at Paris) and as a performer/designer for ALICE: A Steampunk Concert Fantasy at The Linq. That wild musical interpretation of Alice In Wonderland has been drawing crowds…and critical raves…during its monthly performances at Brooklyn Bowl.

1 - Edited

                                    As Zombie Burlesque’s “Johnny Wifemauller.”

Jeffrey is also the dance captain and a regular performer at V Theater‘s ZOMBIE BURLESQUE, the risque comedy-horror musical that we mentioned awhile back (in a profile of costar Aaron Lucey). AND, he’s the personal stylist/dance captain/dancer for songstress Kristine W., who’s launching another tour this summer.

Check out this music video they shot together at the Las Vegas Life Cube:

As Jeffrey’s talents allow him to reach and expand, it’s easy to imagine seeing his visionary work in major motion pictures, Broadway productions, and shows throughout the world. But for the time being, this innovative young man is putting a very unique stamp on Las Vegas.

44699176_10155620751541786_3290516136436695040_n

Jeffrey with Zombie Burlesque host Enoch Augustus Scott and castmate April Leopardi…

Photos: Jeffrey DeBarathy/Shannon M. Hardin-Oteyza via Facebook, Sammasseur, Zombie Burlesque, Alice – A Steampunk Concert Fantasy

Advertisements

Magic Mike Live Is D.O.A.


Poorly-conceived circus collapses under the weight of its own contradictions…

Imagine a bunch of “bros” arriving in Vegas, intent on having a rowdy time. They prop up their feet at Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club, booze and money in hand, eager to be titillated. But instead of bare breasts and g-strings, the party boys get some low-rent male comedian babbling about his problems…and the ladies stay clothed.

You can believe there would be booing, flying fists and sailing beer bottles within a few minutes if this happened to guys. And yet, that same bait-and-switch is exactly what you’re served at Magic Mike Live…with the genders reversed. It’s a whole lot of  pro-female “humor” and blah-blah-blah masquerading as a male revue.

Magic Mike Live

Magic Mike Live

Despite being named after actor Channing Tatum’s pair of male-stripper films, this live show has essentially ZERO to do with them. It starts off promisingly enough, with local favorite Mark Shunock (Rock of Ages) gliding into the audience with a flashy jacket and flashier grin, then quickly plummets down the stairs.

One would assume that Shunock is channeling the first film’s “Dallas” (loosely based on real-life Vegas resident London Steele of Kings of Hustler). That calculating club owner, as portrayed by Matthew McConaughey, would make the perfect campy host for a rowdy night out. Alas, after a few raunchy jokes about desert-dried vaginas and such, Shunock disappears entirely (a cardboard standee of him is brought out during final bows…I’m not kidding).

Magic Mike Live

Next, a troupe of dancers enters the performance space, clad as your typical fantasy-hero types: cowboy, fireman, police officer, etc. A woman is coaxed onstage from the audience. It turns out that she is a plant…and subsequently the REAL emcee of the show. This abrasively-voiced harpy chides these characters for being misogynistic and cliched. But isn’t that what the movies were about?

What attracted audiences to the films were Channing and his hot Hollywood pals gyrating around in various states of undress, not the plot line. Complaints of “too much story” were even addressed in the sequel, wherein dance numbers and skin quotient were amped up.

Tatum and his production company, Iron Horse Entertainment, decided…after reading message boards…fans were demanding “more dancing and less story”. “Look, at the end of the day, it’s a stripper movie,” he says. Hence the extended dance sequences, with catchy tunes and screaming women in the background. The Straits Times, 7/8/15

Magic Mike Live

               The cast of Magic Mike Live begs you to buy into their nonsense…

But back to the show….the collection of “Village People rejects” are forced offstage by the actual dancers of MML. You’re told in no uncertain terms that these are the kind of guys that women TRULY fantasize about. Spotlights scan the crowd, searching for “a doctor, a musician, the nice guy with a job, someone who will rub your feet without being asked”…you know, the type of men that sex-crazed women flew all the way to Vegas to drool over.

The hostess then promises multi-cultural offerings in what’s to follow and proves so by lining up four men in deepening shades of brown.  She squawks “I’ve always wanted to have a mixed (bi-racial) baby!” in an irritating cackle. Imagine how offensive this scene would be if viewed in the context of a stage production of ROOTS. It’s as ugly and off-putting as it sounds.

Magic Mike Live

Tatum has promised in interviews that Magic Mike Live would not reflect the movies (but has no issue with using the bankable name). Instead, his goal was for this project to focus on “female empowerment.” According to this show, what women want is just someone to impregnate them and pay their bills. It seems to me that women relying on men to get through life is the antithesis of female empowerment, wouldn’t you say?

So if you’re heading to Magic Mike Live to get your guy-porn on, you’ve just learned in no uncertain terms that you are SOL. Fortunately, there are genuine, infinitely superior and far less expensive male revues in Las Vegas for ladies (and gay guys) to spend their entertainment dollars on.

The messages conveyed in MML are so conflicting that they’re delusional. The fun-sucking emcee, portrayed by little-known Chicago comedienne Lyndsay Nicole Hailey (with Vegas local Chelsea Phillips-Reid subbing on Wednesdays), turns what might have been a guilty pleasure into a treatise on man-bashing. Expect divorce rates to soar among ticket-buyers.

At this point, you might be wondering how anything from the Magic Mike films connects to this fiasco. That answer comes in two parts. First, Lyndsay prays to a “mystical unicorn” who rewards her with a bejeweled microphone lowered from the ceiling (a magic mic….seriously?). She uses said mic to lure a handsome waiter onstage to try his hand at a striptease. It turns out that he’s also a plant…an employee supposedly named “Mike”. Oh, brother.

In the film, Mike is a construction worker who persuades a new guy on the crew to moonlight with him at a dance club. In a lame effort to distance the show from the movie, Mike is now the newbie instead.  He claims that he can’t dance, so Lyndsay exposes him to a series of sequences designed to fire up his libido and get those hips gyrating.

Magic Mike Live

What follows is a watered-down variation on Absinthe. Sets, props, and characters descend from the ceiling and rise from the floor. Singers, acrobats, aerialist and musicians appear, awkwardly draping audience members across a grand piano and the lap of a drummer.

Songs take center stage with relatively little in the way of actual strip-tease. The dancers are fully clothed for much of the proceedings. When they aren’t, you might find yourself wishing they were.

Magic Mike Live

It’s a bumpy ride both onstage and off at Magic Mike Live….      

The emcee struts onstage after each sequence, loudly declaring “how hot that was!”. At one point, that swagger becomes a stagger…her blouse and jacket are torn apart and her hair has fallen loose. “I feel like my vagina was just beaten up!” she exclaims. Is this entertainment or a PSA for battered women? Whatever it is, it’s in poor taste…and not funny in the slightest.

Magic Mike Live

Exactly 54 minutes pass before the first guy ditches his pants. Even then, his church-friendly briefs stay in place. How do I know the length of time so precisely? Because I couldn’t stop staring at my watch, eager for this mess to end.

Before the show limps its painful but welcome finale, Lyndsay can’t resist one final reminder of the inadequacies of men. She urges the ladies in the audience to get to their feet and hold one another. “When’s the last time you slow-danced with someone?”, she asks. Thanks, MML, for that feminist group-therapy session. Can we have some fun now?

If you’ve noticed that I haven’t reviewed the dancers, that’s because they play such an inconsequential part of the production as a whole. None of them are particularly memorable. Not even “Mike”, whose transformation into the titular character is actually quite dull.

Magic Mike Live

Magic Mike Live

The saving grace of the production is the venue itself. LOTS of Tatum-infused cash has been laid out to transform Hard Rock‘s Body English nightclub into an absolutely glorious theater. The corridor leading into it is tastefully appointed (aside from dozens of oddly-empty picture frames). A narrow stairway leads you down to the basement theater, a multi-level beauty.

Magic Mike Live

One oddity worth mentioning is the lack of a gift shop. Where are the t-shirts, calendars, posters and memorabilia? These things are standard at most Vegas shows. With more than a year of preparation since MML was announced, surely a line of souvenirs could have been produced and marketed. Very strange…as if Hard Rock had little faith in an extended run.

Update – since the original publishing of this review, an online store has been established. I’m uncertain if products are available at the showroom, as I’ve not been (and have no intention of going) back.

Magic Mike Live No

                                       This audience member’s sign says it all…

Once seated, a massive team of attractive ushers, bartenders and wait staff will make you feel welcome and pampered. A Hard Rock insider told me two months ago that all waiters and bartenders would be shirtless throughout their shifts (sadly, that’s not the case). But even without a show, I’d still stop there just to let them serve me a cocktail…or three.

Magic Mike Live

The true standouts here are indeed the wait staff…a collection of charming, attentive and handsome lads that exude more charisma and sex appeal than anything you’ll see onstage. Imagine, if you will…the first fake-out (Village People vs. Modern Man) gives way to a SECOND fake-out, wherein the studly waiters who’ve been giving you excellent service suddenly set down their trays and take to the stage. Now THAT would have been different…and far superior to anything that MML currently offers.

Magic Mike Live

          Superstar Channing Tatum tossed oodles of money onto a vacuous stage….

As it is now, Magic Mike Live is a misandristic mess…an expensive and overblown bomb that’s about as sexy as Menopause – The Musical. It ranks alongside the first phase of Criss Angel BeLIEve as one of the most poorly-conceived Vegas productions of the past decade.

This is one major show desperately in need of a gutting and overhaul. Tomorrow wouldn’t be soon enough.

MAGIC MIKE LIVE performs Wednesday through Sunday at 8 pm and 10:30 pm. Tickets start at $75 (plus taxes/fees) and can be ordered here

Photos: Sammasseur